Published On: Sat, Jul 28th, 2012

Linda And Sue, Queertet. Theatre Review, Lantern Theatre, Liverpool.

 L.S. Media Rating ****

Cast: Annie Edwards, Roxanne Male, Jonathon Roberts, Jasmin Pritchard, Monique Bouley.

Love and jealousy, as intrinsically entwined together as almost any other human emotion; especially when the two lovers have a difference in age and one has a grown up son from a previous relationship and the other one has younger friends. All of this can lead to bitterness if not handled with sensitivity and care, on both parts.

Such is the premise of Chris Christou’s play for the Queertet Festival of plays at The Lantern Theatre, Linda and Sue.

Chris Christou takes what could be a delicate story of love and insecurity and with Jen Bea very good direction, shows the realism that is needed between two people who are of differing ages and different early relationship structures. Both Linda and Sue have in parts come to terms with their love for each other but as with any couple, the spectre of the past and its possible future over hangs true domestic bliss, especially when the older of the two still feels the occasional pull of a need for the closeness of a man’s body.

In other hands, a tale; even one that has the running time of half an hour and relies heavily on the imagination and subtle sympathy of the audience, could have almost been a subject of pity, farce or worse misunderstanding. However the genuine and touching way the two women feel for each other is carried off, if not towards a perfect future, then to the point where the sympathy is turned into joy at both women learning something of each other and of themselves.

The dance and song mimicry scenes especially were delightful, word of warning, you will not think of the song Let’s Face the Music and Dance again without a weird looking smile appearing on your face. Both Annie Edwards and Roxanne Male as the two lovers Linda and Sue were more than suited for the parts, Annie Edwards especially gave a performance to be proud of.

A very enjoyable play and one that could be lengthened even further without losing any of the subtle yet powerful emotions on offer.

Ian D. Hall

About the Author

- Ian was bought up in Birmingham and has lived for the last eight years in a city he has come to think of as his home. In the last ten years he has worked for two of the finest media organisations it has been his pleasure to be part of, the Birmingham Mail and LSMedia. In the three years he has been part of the team here and has reviewed over 1,000 theatre performances, albums and gigs, travelling as far as Montreal to cover music. His dearest loves are Prog, Heavy Metal, Rock and the theatre.